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» Here’s How You Can Help Stop the Dakota Access Pipeline
By Jake Tracy, yes! Magazine
January 27, 2017


No Fracked Gas in Mass’ Rosemary Wessel just spoke with Linda Black Elk of the Standing Rock Medic Council on Dec. 6th:

“We are in desperate need of water, firewood and heat sources in camp. Little Buddy Propane Heaters would also be very helpful! Food is also needed in camp and at satellite safe spaces.  (For those thinking on joining the camp): It’s best if people stay away until the roads are cleared.

Winter conditions are intense, but spirits at camp are high. Everyone has been working together to get people to delegated warming spaces in camp and spaces on the reservation. Medics, security, and veterans have been going from shelter to shelter to do wellness checks on our water protectors. Women, children, elders and other folks who wish to leave camp are being evacuated with four wheel drive vehicles and operators who know how to use them.”

The Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council explains the medical & health situation at the Dakota Access Pipeline Resistance Camps (Oceti Sakowin, Sicangu/Rosebud, Sacred Stone, etc.) in light of the ongoing blizzard conditions and 1806 police roadblock.
» Please read the press release

Please also watch our matriarch’s, Linda Black Elk, video.


» Standing Rock Sioux Chairman, David Archambault asks protesters to go home
by CAROLINE GRUESKIN, Bismarck Tribune
December 6, 2015
Article includes video statement from Chairman Archambault

» Read Chairman Archambault’s official statement


Army will not grant easement for Dakota Access Pipeline crossing
by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
December 4, 2016

The Department of the Army will not approve an easement that would allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, the Army’s Assistant Secretary for Civil Works announced today.

Jo-Ellen Darcy said she based her decision on a need to explore alternate routes for the Dakota Access Pipeline crossing. Her office had announced on November 14, 2016 that it was delaying the decision on the easement to allow for discussions with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, whose reservation lies 0.5 miles south of the proposed crossing. Tribal officials have expressed repeated concerns over the risk that a pipeline rupture or spill could pose to its water supply and treaty rights.

“Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it’s clear that there’s more work to do,” Darcy said. “The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.”

» Read the rest of the Army Corps of Engineers statement


Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Statement on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Decision to Not Grant Easement
Posted on December 4, 2016

“Today, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not be granting the easement to cross Lake Oahe for the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Instead, the Corps will be undertaking an environmental impact statement to look at possible alternative routes. We wholeheartedly support the decision of the administration and commend with the utmost gratitude the courage it took on the part of President Obama, the Army Corps, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior to take steps to correct the course of history and to do the right thing.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and all of Indian Country will be forever grateful to the Obama Administration for this historic decision.

We want to thank everyone who played a role in advocating for this cause. We thank the tribal youth who initiated this movement. We thank the millions of people around the globe who expressed support for our cause. We thank the thousands of people who came to the camps to support us, and the tens of thousands who donated time, talent, and money to our efforts to stand against this pipeline in the name of protecting our water. We especially thank all of the other tribal nations and jurisdictions who stood in solidarity with us, and we stand ready to stand with you if and when your people are in need.”

» Read full statement


Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics Partners Respond to the Statement from the Department of the Army
Press Release, Energy Transfer Partners
December 4, 2016

“ETP [Energy Transfer Partners] and SXL [Sunoco] are fully committed to ensuring that this vital project is brought to completion and fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe. Nothing this Administration has done today changes that in any way.”

» Read full statement from ETP


Of course, with the vast majority of the pipeline already completed, many questions remain. Honor the Earth gathered some of the most common ones into one Facebook post:

Today the US Army Corps announced that it will not grant the last remaining easement needed for Dakota Access to cross the Mni Sose (Missouri River). Their statement says they intend to “explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing” and that a consideration of alternative routes “would be best accomplished through an Environmental Impact Statement with full public input and analysis.” This is all the information provided.

This is an enormous victory for our movement to protect the water! It shows what is possible when we come together and take action.
However, many questions remain.

Here are the 10 questions we need to be asking in the days and weeks ahead:

1. Will the Army Corps actually conduct an Environmental Impact Statement? If so, on what portion of the project – just the river crossing, or the whole pipeline?
2. What issues will the EIS take into account? (for example, will it include an analysis of spill risk? how about sacred sites? will it reassess the economic need for the pipeline now that the bakken is busting?)
3. Which alternative routes will be considered? Will a “no-build” option also be considered?
4. How long will the EIS take?
5. What input will the tribe have? What will the public participation process look like?
6. In what way(s) was the original Environmental Assessment prepared by the Army Corps deemed inadequate?
7. What was the result of the tribal consultation process exploring possible changes to the regulatory process for pipelines in general? have any changes been proposed?
8. How easily will these decisions be reversed by a Trump administration?
9. How will these decisions be affected by the outcomes of DAPL’s lawsuit against the Army Corps, scheduled to be heard on Friday?
10. Is the US government prepared to use force to stop the company from drilling under the river without a permit, if necessary?

(Photo ©David Goldtooth)

(Photo ©David Goldtooth)

Sacred Stone Camp, in cooperation with the FANG Collective has put together a site for those wishing to stand in solidarity and offer support through legal funds or directly send supplies.
» See how you can help


9/25/16 – UPDATE from LINDA BLACK ELK as Sacred Stone Camps brace for winter:

Hi everyone!
The Sacred Stone Camps are preparing for winter and a lot of folks are asking for ways to continue to help. This is overwhelming to us…we are so thankful that people understand that we are out here to protect water, sacred sites, treaty rights, and environmental quality for EVERYONE.

If you are interested in helping, here are some really important ways you can contribute:

1) We need one of these water purifiers for each of the five campshttp://eartheasy.com/lifestraw-community

2) We need tipis with liners, yurts, arctic tents, old RVs, or materials to build winter structures. (2x4s, 4x4s, drywall, plywood, steel roofing, insulation, cement, gravel)…or gift cards for Menard’s or Lowe’s.

3) Solar panels and wind turbines – we need materials and people who know how to set them up.

4) We need food. In particular… dried meat, canned meat, cured meats, dried/canned beans, rice, dehydrated/canned vegetables, pasta, and canned milk.

These items can be mailed to:

Sacred Stone Camp
P.O. Box 1011
Fort Yates, ND 58538

— Linda Black Elk, Sept. 25, 2016


WHAT IS DAPL?
Pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners is constructing the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), a high pressure oil transmission pipeline, running from the Bakken shale play in North Dakota to Illinois.  Among many sensitive areas along the route is the Standing Rock Sioux reservation.  DAPL is slated to cross under the Missouri river, just upstream from the water intake for Standing Rock.

WHY THE PROTECTORS ARE OPPOSING
Concerned for possible loss of their water source if an accident occurs, and having not been included in the review process for the pipeline, the people of Standing Rock reservation have been standing up in peaceful protest to the construction of DAPL.

Over 100 other tribes and people of all backgrounds have joined in, either directly at the Sacred Stone Camp as Protectors (that word being more descriptive of their goal than “Protester”), or by sending in support for legal funds or supplies.

On September 3, after tribal leaders had filed information about sacred and burial sites identified in the pipeline path, Energy Transfer sent work crews directly to the sites on, the Saturday before Labor Day, without announcement and with a private security crew armed with mace and attack dogs.

This was while all parties were waiting for the September 9 ruling in federal court on an injunction filed against the pipeline by the Standing Rock Tribe.

The ruling on September 9 did not grant the injunction, but shortly after it was announced, the Army, Department of Justice and Department of the Interior filed a joint statement, pausing construction work on Army Corps land along the Missouri River and making a non-binding request to hold off on construction for 20 miles to the east and west of the Lake Oahe section of the Missouri River.

It’s important to not that this is just a small portion of the pipeline route.  Dakota Access revealed that most of the construction associated with DAPL is, in fact, already complete. Because only 3% of the pipeline is subject to federal permitting, Dakota Access has always been free to proceed with the vast majority of the construction, which will occur on private land. In fact, 48% of the pipeline had already been cleared, graded, trenched, piped, backfilled, and reclaimed.

Though some people see this as “win”, this is still only a very limited step in the right direction – where it will lead remains to be seen. Part of the official statement from the Sacred Stone Camp:

”…we have seen time and time again, a consistent strategy from the State in these situations: string out the process, break it to us gradually to avoid a big confrontation, present the illusion of careful, thoughtful review of the case, tempt us with promises of modest reforms…but then in the end make the same decision that serves money not people. So far this is just talk, not actions, and actions are all we should care about. Stop the pipeline, and then we’ll celebrate. We are not leaving until this is over.”

One of the best overviews of the Sept. 9 developments we’ve seen came from Protector, Joye Braun in a live video on Facebook:

“… this joint statement from the Army, the people actually over the Army Corp of Engineers, and the Dept. of Interior and Dept. of Justice … basically asking Dakota Access not to do any construction for 20 miles east, or 20 miles west. That’s a voluntary thing – it’s just voluntary. The one thing that they don’t have access to is the river. So they do not have access to the Missouri River or Army Corps land right now. So, they cannot go under the river, but if they choose to ignore the voluntary request by the Presidential administration, then they can continue to bulldoze and dig up our grave sites and our sacred sites.

So for the next few days, while we’re celebrating, we also need to be watchful and really look at what Energy Transfer is going to do.

But don’t forget, there’s also the James River, which has sacred sites and cultural sites on it as well.
Don’t forget that the Mississippi is also at risk.
Don’t forget that they’re still laying pipe in South Dakota.
Don’t gorget that they’re still laying pipe in Iowa.
And we cannot forget the tribes in South Dakota.
We cannot forget the Meskwaki in Iowa.
And we cannot forget all of our allies, who are facing the very, very, very real threat of Dakota Access.

So this gives you little bit more overview of what’s going on.
It’s a win for today, but it’s also a cautious win.

So with that, let’s keep praying, let’s stay vigilant and let’s remember what we’re here to do. Save Mni Wiconi – Water Is Life.”


Important perspective:
» Erased By False Victory: Obama Hasn’t Stopped DAPL
by Kelly Hayes, Transformative Spaces
September 10, 2016


» CHECK THE DAPL NEWS PAGE

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